Professor Peter Chenoweth BVSc, PhD, MACT, MACVSc

Professor Peter Chenoweth Professor of Veterinary Reproduction
School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Charles Sturt University
Phone: 6933 2652
E-mail: pchenoweth@csu.edu.au

Career Brief

After completing a degree in BVSc at the University of Queensland (UQ), Peter Chenoweth commenced graduate studies on bull fertility supported by the Australian Meat Research Committee. This was followed by a stint in private veterinary practice in northern Queensland before assuming the positions of Assistant Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics of Colorado State University and then Associate Professor (Theriogenology) in the Department of Veterinary Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, at Texas A&M University. During this time he completed his PhD ("Studies on Aspects of the Reproductive Function of Young Beef Bulls in Central Queensland") through UQ.

Dr Chenoweth returned to Australia in 1980 to take up the position of Director of the UQ Pastoral Veterinary Centre at Goondiwindi, Queensland, progressing to the position of Deputy Dean (Clinical) of the UQ School of Veterinary Science. He was appointed as Reader within the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Head of the Reproduction and Behaviour Section of the UQ School of Veterinary Science. During this time, he spent a year on sabbatical leave as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, at the University of Florida (UF).

In 1990, Dr Chenoweth returned to the US as an Associate Professor within the College of Veterinary Medicine, UF; a joint appointment with the Departments of Physiological Sciences and Animal Science. In 1997 he accepted an endowed Chair (Professor and Coleman Chair in Food Animal Production Medicine) within the College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University where he was also an Adjunct Professor at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. In Kansas he established the K-State Andrology Laboratory which provided problem-solving and QA services to the AB industries and was a co-founder of CIVAL (Consortium of Veterinary Andrology Laboratories). During this period he also helped initiate the Association for Applied Animal Andrology (animalandrology.org).

Dr Chenoweth joined the staff of Charles Sturt University's (CSUs) new Veterinary Science program in 2005 as Professor of Veterinary Reproduction. Here he established the animal reproduction teaching programs and facilities, including the CSU Andrology Laboratory.

Research and Teaching Activities

Research Interests
Livestock male fertility/infertility, andrology, reproductive behaviour.

Current Projects
1. Role of male factors in livestock infertility and early pregnancy loss:
Identification of biomarkers for male-factor infertility and potential alleviations

2. Infectious causes of livestock infertility
Identification of the role of viral URT agents affecting sperm function; role of mycoplasmas/ureaplasmas in livestock infertility; role of gametes in transmission and biosecurity/QA.

3. Toxic effects on spermatogenesis and semen quality.
Identification and evaluation of the effects of different causes of spermatoxicty, including; plant-based (eg phyto-estrogens), chemical (eg crop/pasture/animal agricultural chemicals) and antibiotics. This embraces "safety" studies for products destined for liovestock use.

Selected Publications

Chenoweth PJ, Brinks JS and Nett TM (1979) A comparison of three methods of assessing sex-drive in yearling beef bulls and relationships with testosterone and LH levels. Theriogenology 12(4):223-233

Ologun AG*, Chenoweth PJ and Brinks JS. (1981) Relationships among production traits and estimates of sex-drive and dominance value in yearling beef bulls. Theriogenology 15(4):379-388

Chenoweth PJ. (1981) Libido and mating behavior in bulls, boars and rams. A review. Theriogenology 16(2):155-177

Farin PW*, Chenoweth PJ, Mateos ER* and Pexton JE. (1982) Beef bulls mated to estrus synchronized heifers: Single vs multi-sire breeding groups. Theriogenology 17:365-372